The dropping of two-story ceilings

One commonly cited architectural feature of McMansions are two story ceilings, often in the entryway to the home or in the family/great room. A new survey suggests that builders are pulling back on these tall ceilings as people alter their priorities:

Now, trends are more down to earth, another sign of the times. Yes, high ceilings open up living spaces. But many homebuyers want to take advantage of the wasted space on the second floor with perhaps another bedroom. Issues concerning energy inefficiency, sound transmission and a lack of coziness also pointed to the desire for lower ceilings.

Builders have gotten the message. A survey of builders across the country revealed that 14 percent of homes this year will be built with two-story foyers and 12 percent with two-story family rooms, a substantial decline from previous years, said Stephen Melman, director of economic services for the National Association of Home Builders…

“Customer feedback describes two-story open spaces as cold and austere,” Parkman said. “That goes against the current trend toward warmer and more functional spaces. Rooms with two-story ceilings actually can be a negative for some buyers.

This change goes along with plans builders have to construct smaller and greener homes.

What will be interesting to watch is to see how the architectural profile of the McMansion changes in the coming years. The two-story foyer is common but so are other features like a multiple-tier roof (many gables), a brick or fake stone facade, and more. If future McMansions lose these features and for good reasons (such as wanting to be a bit smaller or greener), will they no longer be called McMansions? Or will there be other features of such homes, such as their size or neighborhood, that will still invoke the term?

0 thoughts on “The dropping of two-story ceilings

  1. Pingback: When your extra-large McMansion bathroom requires an extra-large vanity | Legally Sociable

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