A zoning paradox: sacred residential spaces are dependent on their market values

The last page of Sonia Hirt’s book Zoned in the USA lays out a key paradox in the American zoning system:

Isn’t it ironic that American residential space is so sacredly residential (so protected from intrusion through land-use law, that is) only because it is so commercial (because it is an object of trade rather than an object of our sentiments)?

Perhaps this another piece of evidence that single-family homes are one of the biggest objects of American consumption as well as key pieces in the American economic system.

10 thoughts on “A zoning paradox: sacred residential spaces are dependent on their market values

  1. Pingback: Bringing medical clinics to vacant shopping mall space | Legally Sociable

  2. Pingback: To get richer, get the right job and then “buy a home in a neighborhood with a lot of zoning restrictions” | Legally Sociable

  3. Pingback: When two suburban residential developments border each other and have clear differences | Legally Sociable

  4. Pingback: A denser suburbia in California and the rest of the United States | Legally Sociable

  5. Pingback: Doctors connecting health and land use policies | Legally Sociable

  6. Pingback: Chicago aldermen and affordable housing, public housing | Legally Sociable

  7. Pingback: The importance and consequences of separating single-family homes from other land uses in the United States | Legally Sociable

  8. Pingback: The arguments for and against banning zoning for only single-family homes | Legally Sociable

  9. Pingback: Still a limited tiny house movement | Legally Sociable

  10. Pingback: Looking to global examples to address housing crunches in expensive cities | Legally Sociable

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s