Get rid of the bedroom and add a fancy Murphy bed

All the new micro-apartments would benefit from sleek and comfortable Murphy beds:

And a growing number of these projects are installing upscale wall beds that turn back into a sofa (or a dining table, or a desk, or a bookshelf, or a wall-storage unit) by day, giving the small-space dweller the equivalent of a secret room. The design leader of cleverly engineered, high-end, top quality transformable furniture is Clei, the family-owned, Brianza, Italy–based company that celebrated its 50th anniversary last year and is available in the U.S. via Resource Furniture…

“The Murphy bed is a key part of the design,” Hill said. “But there are so many that are cheesy and low-quality, and look like crap. We’re trying to create something really compelling and sophisticated, that doesn’t feel like you’re sacrificing anything. These don’t feel gimmicky or cheap but like a great bed, and a great piece of machinery.”…

Clei beds are the closest thing I have ever seen to furniture performance art. Thanks to sophisticated engineering, they can be opened and closed in seconds with almost no effort, a huge part of their appeal…

The beds are made from quality materials and offer ultra-sleek contemporary Italian design. Much of the hardware is hidden and the units housing beds are only 12 inches deep. One detail they are working on is finding a way to hide the buckled straps that hold the mattress in place while the bed is being opened and stowed.

And the end of the article starts an interesting discussion about whether bedrooms are necessary. Of course, when space is very limited, furniture that is movable or that can serve multiple uses is very helpful. Some of these micro-apartments are very clever about storage, fold-down furniture, and even moving walls.

One feature not mentioned about the high-end Murphy bed: is it comfortable? Can you get a good night’s sleep? It may not matter if the bet design is here if the bed isn’t comfortable…

Another thought about micro-apartments: while they can be good for providing affordable housing and also encouraging people to live with less, could they fall prey to becoming status symbols all about the latest design? Given the price of some of the features needed to live comfortably with only a few hundred square feet, it may not be too cheap to have a comfortable apartment with only a few hundred square feet. For example, the IKEA store models of small apartments don’t have terribly expensive things but they aren’t necessarily trying to be trendy.